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While many people associate writing wills in Florida with aging, the reality is that some types of wills can be useful at any age. Although younger people are less likely to overly concern themselves with the possibility of death, accidents and terminal illnesses have little regard for age, and it may someday be necessary for someone else to make decisions on a young person’s behalf. Living wills can be beneficial in such circumstances.

As their name implies, living wills operate in the background while a person is still alive. Should someone who has written a living will suffer from some form of life-threatening debilitation, a living will may come into play. A properly crafted will should ideally stipulate the person’s desires for eventualities such as end-of-life care.

Living wills are also known as advance directives and are essentially intended for emergency situations that will only take effect in specific situations. Having such a directive in place can lead to better informed decisions from doctors and family members involved in a person’s case. In addition, it can potentially remove a great deal of stress and guilt from family members who could otherwise have a great deal of difficulty deciding what the appropriate course of action might be.

For these and other reasons, having a living will can help someone better achieve a degree of peace of mind for themselves and their loved ones. If someone would like to set up a living will, they may wish to discuss their specific life circumstances with an attorney familiar with estate planning to facilitate the process. An attorney might be able to provide counsel related to the endeavor and also assemble whatever documentation is necessary to carry it through.

Source: U.S. News & World Report, “Why You Need a Living Will – Even at Age 18”, Amir Khan, Accessed on Jan. 16, 2015